‘Flash crash’ trader’s bail bid fails

Judge rules Sarao may flee if surety reduced to £50,000

GSK drops plans for IPO of HIV drugs unit

Pharma group promises to hold dividend steady for three years

Oil rebound tests its limits

Bulls in charge as Brent rises above $69 a barrel

Gilts hit in intensifying bond sell-off

Yield on UK 10-year debt moves above 2%

Cameron ‘still fighting for a majority’

Tories ready to talk with Lib Dems if poll produces hung parliament

EU unveils digital market shake-up plan

Brussels prepares for showdown with US internet companies

Sainsbury suffers first loss in a decade

Charges of £753m wipe out retailer’s underlying profit

Asian buyers snap up Impressionists

Sotheby’s kicks off spring auctions by reeling in $368m

Bollywood star guilty in hit-and-run case

Salman Khan’s 13-year case raises doubts over Indian justice

Sex doesn’t sell for Playboy in China

Censorship has stripped ‘bunny ears’ brand of erotic connotations

Daimler driverless truck

Nevada approves autonomous Daimler trucks

Goal of transforming freight transport safety remains long haul

Comment and Analysis

No, stocks aren’t a good inflation hedge. Try bonds (really).

Matthew Klein on the implications of negative, long-term real interest rates

Hala Fadel
©Thierry Van Biesen

Backing Beirut

A quiet revolution is happening in Lebanon as female entrepreneurs attract attention from investors

Election uncertainty takes toll on traders

It is the economic outcome that matters to gilts and the pound

Best comments from our readers


"'Rekindle' implies Russians have become ashamed of being Russians, which is at odds with Putin's enormous popularity at home. They have never lacked national pride. Some westerners can't understand this, having been raised on a diet of supposed Russian inferiority/ backwardness, subjugation etc. It's one of the reasons we are in the mess we are in today."
By Njegos on Russia looks back to the war to rekindle national pride



"If Greece, after 15 minutes of rebellious fame, decides to return to co-operating with the old ways of 'pretend and extend', the EZ will likely follow the old adage on failed marriages and costly divorces: 'it's cheaper to keep her'. The real fault line of the euro is Italy and, even more so, France."
By Phillip Vandamm on Grexit may be the best end for a bad marriage


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