Sublimotion in Ibiza
©ScottWright/Limelight Studio

Taste the difference

The world’s most expensive restaurant opened in Ibiza in 2014. Curiously, there was already one like it — in Shanghai

From the archive

David Miliband Lunch with the FT illustration ©James Ferguson
As emails between the former British foreign secretary and Hillary Clinton are published, read his Lunch with the FT from last year, in which he reflected on losing the Labour leadership to his brother
– by John Thornhill
Tom Courtenay ©Thom Atkinson
As his acclaimed new film ‘45 Years’ hits cinemas, the poster boy of 1960s kitchen-sink realism talks about his retreat from — and return to — stardom
– by Peter Aspden
Mary-Kay Wilmers
©Luke Waller

Mary-Kay Wilmers

Over artichoke risotto in Marylebone, the formidable editor of the London Review of Books talks to Lucy Kellaway about controversy, literary neighbours and Helena Bonham Carter

©Allstar

‘Trigger Mortis’, by Anthony Horowitz

Crisp one-liners, deadly peril, an uber-villain — Anthony Horowitz’s 007 novel has all the time-honoured ingredients, writes Simon Schama

What Katie (and Luella) did next

Two of Britain’s best-known and most popular designers on launching their label together

An early 19th-century watchtower, now the Tainaron Blue Retreat guesthouse
©George Messaritakis

Walks amid the watchtowers of the Mani

William Dalrymple explores the wild mountains and ancient churches of Greece’s far south

Who - Danger signs in Imber
Where - Army training area and abandoned town of Imber 
When - 23/08/2015
Why - Visting the abandoned town of Imber

By bus to the ‘ghost village’ of Imber

For one day a year, buses run to an English village with no residents. By Matthew Engel

Tom Courtenay and Charlotte Rampling in '45 Years'

45 Years — film review

The gripping story of a marriage shaken by a ghost from the past

©Toby Whitebread

Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan quartet

This tetralogy shines because of its vibrant, unflinching study of friendship, writes Claire Messud

Eelco Smits in ‘Song from Far Away,’ taken during a performance in Brazil
©Jan Versweyveld

What do dramaturgs do?

Sarah Hemming investigates the shadowy figures behind some of theatre’s biggest hits

Book cover of 'Invention of Science'

‘The Invention of Science’, by David Wootton

A landmark history captures the excitement of the scientific revolution and makes a point of celebrating the advances it ushered in. Review by Andrea Wulf

YOUR VIEWS

Write a letter to the Editor of the Financial Times at letters.editor@ft.com

FOLLOW FT WEEKEND

Visit the FT's social media and communities page
SHARE THIS QUOTE