• Review

    His first posthumous album to emerge is a recording of the singer-songwriter vamping songs on the piano

  • Review

    The band employ an impasto of sounds and concoct a melodramatic rock choral with a heavy dose of eastern mysticism

  • Review

    Conducted with impressive concentration, the music is played with definition, clarity and sheer zing

  • Review

    The title track starts as a meditation on chance, coincidence and roads not taken, and ends up as a contemplation of death

  • Review

    The collection develops the electronic sound of its predecessor while moving away from the orchestral elements

  • Review

    Saxophonists Caleb Curtis and Kenny Pexton re-configure Charlie ‘Yardbird’ Parker’s compositions into contemporary shapes

  • Review

    The artist’s collaborators provide a shimmering timbre of xylophone and metallic gongs to sit with her meditations on mortality

  • Review

    The cellist’s years of experience add depth of expression and his playing seems ever more effortless

  • Review

    US artist’s first studio recording in 12 years features arpeggios rippling across figured bass and baroque cadences

  • Promoted Content
  • Review

    Double album includes songs that have a chunky, brash sound and are enjoyable exercises in dance-floor abandon

  • Review

    Collection includes an opener that is driven by powerful drumming; break-up songs dominate the latter half

  • Review

    An album of acoustic rock with folk influences, a music evocative of campfires and rustling leaves

  • Review

    Songs blend Norwegian melancholy and desolate electronic textures with orchestral warmth

  • Review

    A collection including 10 brilliantly refashioned songs from the artist’s solo back catalogue

  • Review

    The best songs tell a story, give voice to a character or explore a conceit

  • Review

    An analogue circuit of country-rock ballads, gospel choirs, wall-of-sound production and fiery psychedelic maelstroms

  • Review

    The American mezzo casts a glimmering, romantic sheen over the half-dozen Strauss songs

  • Review

    The singer’s 16th solo album is a mish-mash of Latin rhythms, electronics and a half-formed story about family life

  • Review

    The saxophonist applies his full-toned fluency to a set of modernist covers in the company of a rootsy organ trio

  • Review

    The album features lyrics that are elliptical, rooted in the personal but hinting at the political

  • Review

    Dramatic contrivances abound, yet there is also a spontaneity and unpredictability about the music

  • Review

    A solid set of house and disco numbers in which upfront ballroom attitude is articulated through emphatic beats

  • Review

    The band’s follow-up album has a scourging intensity to it, a determination to get to the ugly truth

  • Review

    Daniel Barenboim draws a rich panoply of colours from his modern grand while the Pierre Boulez Saal adds an appropriately warm acoustic

  • Review

    The album’s elements — voices, guitars, drums — sporadically coalesce into moments of crunchy rock or tense funk