Old-school reply to advertiser’s threat

Meg Whitman’s lieutenant was ‘disappointed’ with what I’d written. Here is my considered response

'When Breath Becomes Air', by Paul Kalanithi

‘When Breath Becomes Air’, by Paul Kalanithi

A neurosurgeon’s memoir of his final months is an urgent meditation on life, not death. Review by Lucy Kellaway

Boneheaded aphorisms from Davos

The World Economic Forum’s 36 best quotes are almost all dismal. But the idiots are not the speakers

Readers’ submissions update Guffipedia

‘Deepen food-to-go leadership’ and ‘real time chops’

FT | Biz Life Author Margareth Hefferman photographed at her home in Farrington Gurney, Somerset. 25th June 2014 Pic Gareth Iwan Jones

January is for cutting hours, not alcohol

In elite circles it is becoming vulgar to flaunt workaholism and that view may be spreading

Guffipedia: New corporate language crimes

‘Ideation’ is one of those to make the cut for jargon dictionary

Punit Renjen, Chairman of the Board, Deloitte USA, shares his personal story of starting his career in India working in his father's electric switchgear workshop, in addition to key insights into his cultural background, career takeaways and business imperatives for Deloitte. mage from Deloitte.
©Deloitte

Deloitte CEO’s classic in demotivation

Anyone in possession of even a normal IQ would wonder why they were working there

Guffipedia: Data buckets and convenings

Reader-submitted jargon accepted into Lucy Kellaway’s dictionary

Gorilla and businesspeople having meeting in conference room
©iStock

Pranks are no laughing matter to the young

My generation couldn’t resist a spoof email but millennials can

Get stoked by year’s worst corporate guff

Many entries in the 2015 Golden Flannel Awards made the flesh creep as well as offending eye and ear

‘Spark Joy’, by Marie Kondo

The FT columnist, an early convert to the Japanese author’s tidying method, is now not so sure

Guffipedia: a dictionary of corporate nspeak

Guffipedia: a dictionary of business jargon

Guffipedia, an outlet for all BS victims

A repository for the worst jargon — and fresh reader submissions

Stories are best for the Bible and novels

The fad for presenting your career or company as a ‘story’ has gone too far

Why I love my office building

Just when designers are building better work spaces, people are losing the habit of working in them

Feeling useless is essential for success

One problem of getting older is that your self-knowledge goes up but so does your complacency

There’s no place like Yahoo — Mayer is right

Chief’s move to make staff vow to stay is smart, just like ‘Wizard of Oz’ dress-up idea for management

The random and outrageous boss crush

When executives fall for an employee and overpromote them, they ensure disaster

Barclays boss must ditch focus on value

Jes Staley’s email to underlings starts well but fails on its use of the ‘v-word’

The Lucy Kellaway Interview: Martin Lewis

Worth more than £100m and more googled than Beyoncé, the Money Saving Expert talks about shopping at pound stores and the problem with Lucy Kellaway’s energy bills

ABOUT LUCY

Lucy KellawayLucy Kellaway is an Associate Editor and management columnist of the FT. For the past 15 years her weekly Monday column has poked fun at management fads and jargon and celebrated the ups and downs of office life.

In her 25 years at the FT, Lucy has been energy correspondent, Brussels correspondent, a Lex writer, and an interviewer of business people and celebrities for the Lunch with the FT series and the FT Weekend. Prizes include Columnist of the Year in the British Press Awards 2006, Industrial Society WorkWord Award (twice), Best Commentator, Business Journalist of the Year Awards 2007 and the Wincott Young Financial Journalist Award. Her first book, Sense and Nonsense in the Office, was published by FT Prentice Hall in 1999. Martin Lukes: Who Moved My BlackBerry(TM) (2005) and In Office Hours (2010) were published by Penguin.

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