Why we no longer trust the experts

Illustration by Shonagh Rae of a mobile phone being a source of information
©Shonagh Rae

‘If we rely on crowd-sourced advice to choose healthcare or holidays, it seems strange to expect voters to listen to experts when it comes to politics’

Gillian Tett/Frontline Q&A

The FT and the Frontline correspondent Martin Smith and producer Marcela Gaviria join for a discussion of Money, Power and Wall Street, the special investigation into the struggles to rescue and repair a shattered US economy following the financial crisis, being aired on the PBS network

Brexit: interest rate outlook will shift

Future historians may conclude this is one of the most important ripple effects of the poll

Markets pass first Brexit stress test

No signs of ‘Lehman moment’ as banks and central bankers learn their lesson

©Shonagh Rae

Resilience in a time of crises

‘The modern world is such a tightly connected system that it is a fantasy to think we can ever abolish all threats’

A small step for gig economy workers

Whisper it quietly: Uber executives have realised their drivers need to feel a touch more secure

Illustration by Shonagh Rae
©Shonagh Rae

Selling Donald Trump

‘Not only is it unclear whether the Republican elders can ever control Trump, it is less clear whether Trump can control himself’

Finance geeks must have say on Brexit

As with Lehman, technical points apparent only to experts can set off unpredictable chain reactions

Kidney
©iStock

Review – The Inner Lives of Markets

The more markets theory affects us, the more likely a backlash is

©Shonagh Rae

A vote for online elections

‘It seems peculiar that nobody has been able to devise a way to make cyber voting secure’

Stock market numbers

A promise of real corporate transparency

Analysts need a way to track links between companies scattered across jurisdictions

The truth about Trump and Mexico

‘If you look at Mexican exports to the US, some 40 per cent of these were created with “made in America” components’

The Fed takes a look beyond US data

The central bank’s equations have tended to ignore events beyond America’s borders

Spending in the age of Snapchat

‘One of the most powerful forms of conspicuous consumption today is not the accumulation of goods but the accumulation of memories’

Trump tax affairs part of bigger concern

Real estate is producing profits, much of which are escaping the tax net

We’d be lost without GPS

‘The more we become dependent on this magical technology, the more vulnerable we become, too’

Hackers target weak links

Cross-border security leaves a lot to be desired

What New York can learn from London

‘Khan’s election makes me proud of my London origins, not because he is a Muslim but because most voters don’t care that he is’

How to change the face of Europe

‘Europe today faces a problem: it lacks a clear creation myth with unifying heroes’

How to Trump-proof your portfolio

You would be a fool to base your investment choice on free-market theories alone

The Taliban v the squash champion

‘When the tournament organisers saw her birth certificate she was exposed as a girl — and the Taliban threatened to kill her for the crime of wearing shorts’

ABOUT GILLIAN

Gillian Tett Gillian Tett serves as US managing editor. She writes weekly columns for the Financial Times, covering a range of economic, financial, political and social issues.

In 2014, she was named Columnist of the Year in the British Press Awards and was the first recipient of the Royal Anthropological Institute Marsh Award. Her other honors include a SABEW Award for best feature article (2012), President’s Medal by the British Academy (2011), being recognized as Journalist of the Year (2009) and Business Journalist of the Year (2008) by the British Press Awards, and as Senior Financial Journalist of the Year (2007) by the Wincott Awards. In June 2009 her book Fool’s Gold won Financial Book of the Year at the inaugural Spear’s Book Awards.

Tett’s past roles at the FT have included US managing editor (2010-2012), assistant editor, capital markets editor, deputy editor of the Lex column, Tokyo bureau chief, and a reporter in Russia and Brussels. Her upcoming book, to be published by Simon & Schuster in 2015, will look at the global economy and financial system through the lens of cultural anthropology.

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