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Different nations have developed varying rules and standards governing the use of personal data harvested over the internet, something companies have to negotiate, and they face hefty penalties if they get it wrong.

Data protection

Data rules weave a tangled global web

Legislation varies from state to state, but EU regulation offers hopes of standardisation

Taxi drivers and their supporters stage a small rally and partial road blockage a day before the start of the World Cup tournament as drivers protest Uber, a U.S. car service which allows people to summon rides with their cell phone on June 11, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazi
©Joe Readle/Getty Images

Marco Civil a step forward say rights activists

The Brazilian law provides protection against government intervention

A hand blocks the view of a computer screen showing a Google search page

Storm over EU court ruling rumbles on

Search engines have been left to act as judge and jury

Gregg Steinhafel

Fears of reputational harm may be overhyped

It seems that customers have short memories when it comes to recalling online data breaches

Inside Tech

Maija Palmer
Maija Palmer asks why incivility is rampant on the world wide web

EU toughens its data protection regime

There will be plenty of legislative twists and turns before companies will see the new rules

Online privacy toolkit developers: Salvatore Iaconesi and Oriana Persico

Conflict over ownership lies ahead

More information is flowing, but can we turn off the tap?

Lawyer Jonathan Armstrong: regulations may vary from country to country

Simple steps to protecting your data

Keeping details safe need not be complicated

David Byttow, chief executive officer and co-founder of Secret
©David Paul Morris/Bloomberg

Why it’s OK to be rude if you’re on a computer

Many anonymous sites have started with laudable aims, but online trolls had other plans

IT and the NGO sector

Digital transforms fundraising landscape

Campaigns to raise money for charity can quickly gain a worldwide following

Technology helps feed a hungry world

Digital can put more supplies on the tables of the needy

HIGHLIGHTS FROM ACROSS THE FT

A woman uses the Uber app on a smartphone ©Getty

FTC investigates whether Uber, Airbnb and others compromise consumers’ privacy

A man types on a laptop computer in an arranged photograph taken in Tiskilwa, Illinois, U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. U.S. officials are discussing whether new standards should be set for government action in response to hacks like the one suffered by Sony Pictures Entertainment, such as if a certain level of monetary damage is caused or if values such as free speech are trampled, National Security Agency Director Michael Rogers said in an interview with Bloomberg News. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg ©Bloomberg

Poland and Romania to be enlisted against hackers after energy companies targeted by ‘Dragonfly’

THE LATEST TECH NEWS FROM ACROSS THE FT

AOL Verizon is no AOL Time Warner

While there may be logic to the deal, it risks looking like too little, too late

Verizon bets on new era in $4.4bn AOL bid

US mobile leader pushes into video and advertising amid new wave of deals

IT, advertising and marketing

Digital reshapes the world of advertising

Marketing spend on online channels is set to increase

How ‘Mad Men’ became maths men

‘The days of faxing over an insertion order and presenting results a month later are over’

Young stars spread advertising message

A much-loved film or sports star in an advertising campaign can do much to boost sales

Five future marketing trends

Potential for creativity to build reputations is growing

Start-up contest boosts online engagement

US company backs innovative ideas to find what inspires customers

Customers’ experience must match expectation

Professionals must take more responsibility for their client projects

Social media as advertising platforms

From Facebook to Snapchat, who offers marketers the best value for money?

Adblocking contest unlikely to end well

Internet advertising inspires an almost visceral loathing, but how else are websites to be funded?

technology and sport

Football embraces goal line cameras

The world of popular sport is gradually embracing better monitoring technology

Devices aim to reduce sports injuries

Products may help avert potential incidents, but they cannot get rid of the dangers

Mobile technologies

Telcos seek to redefine their role

Competition from the likes of Google and Apple disrupts traditional models

Will streaming save the music industry?

Takeup of services will not replace lost revenues just yet

Future of games is on smaller screens

Consoles are being supplanted by mobile devices

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