BKBKWR THE MADNESS OF KING GEORGE (1995) NIGEL HAWTHORNE MOKG 057
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The first casualty of Bennett’s rewrites

From John Ogden. Sir, What makes Christopher Road write (Letters, February 21) that Alan Bennett’s depiction of the madness of George III is soundly based on the evidence?

Stack of paper, paperwork
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Paperwork results from prevention of efficiency

From Martin Lowy. Sir, I find that a lot of paperwork results from two factors

Don’t file papers unless really needed

From Steven S Honigman. Sir, Further to Gillian Tett’s column ‘Tear up the paperwork as an act of revolution’: a wise naval officer once recommended against sending forms and reports upward through the chain of command until they were asked for a third time

Rich global citizens spend a lot of money in UK

From James Beadle. Sir, Richard Brooks’ colourful dissection of ‘non-dom’ tax status (‘A relic of empire that created a tax colony’) is ideologically dismissive and ill-suited to a global business publication such at the FT

A point of view in keeping with Private Eye

From Cllr Tony Devenish. Sir, Richard Brooks’ article (February 21) was a point of view in keeping with Private Eye, not the FT

It was Byron who got to the truth

From Alok Bhargava. Sir, Dean Feeney (Letters, February 14) credits Mark Twain with the aphorism that ‘Truth is stranger than fiction’

Let’s hope Summers never meets Winters

From Charles Lucas. Sir, The change of CEO at Standard Chartered has clearly perked up the headline writers

Draw up repayment profiles for institutions

From Marie-Louise Clayton. Sir, I write with regard to student loans and the recent statement that there will be a failure to repay rate of 45 per cent

Play the name-droppers at their own game

From Guy Wroble. Sir, Simon Kuper (‘The art of name-dropping’, Life & Arts, February 21) may be holding back the best from his readers

State of our housing is a hindrance to progress

From Nicholas Wigdahl. Sir, Yes, Natalie Bennett’s radio interview performance was dire and unfortunately will allow vested interests to snipe

Are British values not fragmented also?

From Peter Breese. Sir, What will be the ‘British values’ to which home secretary Theresa May would demand adherence?

La crise, s’il vous plait

From Louis Marvick. Sir, “Perhaps you are a Francophile,” writes Alexander Gilmour (‘What to buy for half a million’, House & Home, February 21)

We urge the government of Bangladesh to begin dialogue with opposition

From Lord Carlile QC and others. Sir, The Bangladesh government’s decision to arrest Khaleda Zia threatens to destabilise the country more than at any time for a generation

Sustainable investment: big and getting bigger

From Simon Howard. Sir, Jonathan Eley’s Serious Money column does not give a full picture of the rapid growth in what is now more normally called sustainable or responsible investment

Tricky Italian’s still at large — but I was ready for him

From George Coulthard. Sir, Over recent weeks it was interesting to be reminded of the tricky Italian first mentioned by Jeremy Paxman — because I had been approached by him on two separate occasions about 10-15 years ago

Words of comfort from the gillie

From Stephen Collins. Sir, Jeremy Paxman said that fishing is a harmless eccentricity ‘as long as you never do the sum of dividing the money spent on fishing by the numbers of fish caught’

Britain’s case for an independent energy policy

From Ronald Stewart-Brown. Sir, Your editorial assumes that the European Commission’s blueprint for a future EU energy union is sensible for all EU member states to participate in

Gas retains environmental advantage over coal

From George Horsington. Sir, It seems churlish to point out to Sir Crispin Tickell that different fossil fuels produce different amounts of CO2 in relation to the energy they produce

FOMC offers scant guidance on rates

From Han de Jong. Sir, James Mackintosh writes that if investors start to believe the graph of the Federal Reserve’s rate predictions, the ‘Dot Plot’, ‘bond yields could rise scarily fast’

Beijing follows rule of law in corruption crackdown

From Miao Deyu. Sir, The comments in your editorial on the rule of law and the anti-corruption campaign in China are biased and incomprehensive

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