• The value of Microsoft’s investment in ride-hailing app Grab has not been disclosed and was not $200m

  • Finland was partially occupied but not conquered during the second world war, as incorrectly stated in a column on October 5.

  • Norway has a customs arrangement with the EU but is not in the bloc’s customs union as incorrectly stated in an editorial on September 22

  • The world’s pool of professionally managed money is $85tn, rather than $85bn as incorrectly stated in an opinion column on September 21

  • The Colorado Sun staff left the Denver Post of their own volition and were not laid off as reported in Tech World in FT magazine

  • Mahathir Mohamad is Malaysia’s prime minister, not president

  • A front page picture in early international editions of the September 18 issue of the FT wrongly identified Senator Amy Klobuchar as Senator Susan Collins

  • AIG received an $85bn bailout in 2008, not $8.5bn as incorrectly stated in a column on September 8.

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  • German football clubs did not increase their spending on players this summer as incorrectly stated in an article on September 13.

  • Sri Lanka’s short-term external debt is $7.5bn, not $160bn as incorrectly stated by Nomura analysts in an article on September 11.

  • Shinzo Abe is Japan’s prime minister, not the Japanese president as incorrectly stated in an article on September 11.

  • Tesla’s bond price fell to nearly 80 cents on the dollar, rather than falling by 80 cents on the dollar as incorrectly stated in a Lex note on September 8.

  • India bought $15bn of weapons from the US in the decade until the end of last year, rather than in 2017 as incorrectly stated in an article on September 7.

  • Mark Solms, a wine producer quoted in an article on South African land reform on September 5, said he was “increasingly pessimistic” about the direction of the ANC debate on the issue, not “immensely pessimistic”

  • Die Welt’s retail and subscription print sales total 83,660, not 8,366 as wrongly stated in a chart accompanying an article on September 10.

  • Britain’s public spending was slightly higher in the four months to July, not lower as incorrectly stated in an article on July 22.

  • There will be 3,600 new Venezuelan bolívars to the petro, the state-run cryptocurrency, not 60 as incorrectly stated in an article on August 21.

  • Spanish banks are owed $82.3bn by Turkish borrowers, not $83.3bn as wrongly stated in an article on August 11.

  • Jud Linville was head of Citigroup’s global credit card business, not the US card operations, as wrongly stated in an article on August 14.

  • Xi Zhongxun, father of Chinese president Xi Jinping, served a single term in the elite politburo. An article on August 11 wrongly stated he had not risen higher than leader of a province.

  • A photograph accompanying an article on August 3 about student protests in China in support of trade unions was of a demonstration in Hong Kong, not Beijing as wrongly captioned.

  • Bruce Ratner was commissioner of the department of consumer affairs under New York Mayor Ed Koch, not commissioner of public affairs, as wrongly stated in an article on August 6.

  • Bill Erbey, founder and former chairman of Ocwen Financial, has claimed Ocwen was subject to a smear campaign led by Pimco and BlackRock. The allegation was not made by Ocwen itself, as wrongly stated in a headline on August 6.

  • Marc Effron’s book referred to in an article on hard work on August 6 is called Eight Steps to High Performance, not Work Smarter, Not Harder, as wrongly stated.