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In the lead-up to our publication of the FT’s Global MBA ranking 2016 on Monday January 25, we are counting down the days using highlights from the data. Which school will be ranked number one? Join the debate on Twitter @ftbized #ftmba2016

Nearly 10,000 MBA graduates from the class of 2012 from 157 business schools completed the Financial Times questionnaire as part of the 2016 Global MBA ranking, a response rate of 43 per cent. This was two percentage points higher than the 2015 ranking.

One hundred and one schools feature in the 2016 Global MBA ranking, which includes nine new entries from six countries; only two of these are ranked for the first time. The highest-ranked newcomer comes straight in at 43.

Alumni from eight programmes have an average salary greater than $160,000, while salaries at school level range from $88,000 to $186,000. MBA graduates from the class of 2012 have an average salary of $135,000 three years after graduation (PPP adjusted).

MBA graduates from seven programmes saw their salary increase by more than 140 per cent on average, three years after graduation compared with their pre-MBA salaries. Salary increases at school level range from 55 per cent to 190 per cent. Overall, MBA graduates had an average pay increase of 98 per cent.


Six schools in the 2016 FT Global MBA ranking moved up by 15 places or more, with the top climber rising by 21 places.


IMD of Switzerland is ranked number five for its MBA programme’s value-for-money in the 2016 FT Global MBA ranking.


London Business School is ranked number four for the international mobility of its MBA students.


Iese Business School is ranked number three for the international course experience of its MBA programme.

Harvard Business School is ranked number 2 in the FT research rank based on articles published by its faculty between January 2013 and October 2015.


Insead has come top of the FT 2016 Global MBA ranking. It is the first time that a one-year MBA programmes leads the ranking.

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