Skema and Strathclyde in wide-ranging collaboration

The French business school will form a wide-ranging alliance with business school in Scotland

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Skema Business School, which has campuses in France, the US and China, and Glasgow’s University of Strathclyde Business School, with campuses in the Middle East, Hong Kong, Singapore and India, are setting up a far-reaching alliance, which will cover joint research, student exchanges and joint programmes.

“What we wanted was an alliance that would reach all parts of both institutions,” says Susan Hart, dean of Strathclyde.

“Through the alliance with Strathclyde we can mix our students with English-speaking students,” says Alice Guilhon, dean of Skema, the French business school that was created through the merger of ESC Lille and Ceram in 2009. The alliance will go beyond simple exchanges, though. “We want to prove we are a new force in Europe,” adds Prof Guilhon.

In particular the schools plan to launch three MSc pogrammes in global management, tourism and European finance. The third of those “will have a focus on Europe - with all the problems,” explains Prof Guilhon.

Both deans are insistent that they will take the alliance one step at a time. “We want to try and see if the alliance is relevant and strong,” says Prof Guilhon. “After one year we will re-assess.”

The Masters in Global Management, scheduled for launch in 2013, will be a two-year degree and the flagship of the alliance. The two-year structure fits in well with both the French and the Scottish educational systems - Strathclyde traditionally runs two-years masters-level degrees, unlike England where most masters degrees run for a year.

The two schools between them have a presence in 15 locations around the world covering most business regions with the exception of South America. However Prof Guilhon is confident the that Skema will soon announce an alliance in Brazil.

www.strath.ac.uk

www.skema.edu

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