FirstFT – How to deal with ‘toxic’ employees

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Here is a taste of today’s FirstFT – a daily newsletter from the Financial Times. For the full briefing and to sign up, please click here.

How to deal with ‘toxic’ employees Some workers behave so badly they will cause real harm to an organisation. They are so awful that colleagues and customers will leave to avoid working with them, and their behaviour can even be infectious, warns a Harvard Business School study. “You are better off hiring someone who is a bit less productive and confident but cares more about their colleagues.” (FT)

The titans of fintech They made their name on Wall Street. Now, they are trying to disrupt it. Some of the world’s highest-profile bankers are pouring millions of dollars into the booming fintech sector as they tap into new technology providing online financial services from payments and lending to digital currencies and cross-border transfers. (FT)

The ultimate first-class seat It is the pinnacle of luxury travel, but will it take off? An aerospace engineering group in the US has proposed perching a teardrop pod on top of private and commercial jets that would give passengers a 360-degree view of the world around them. (The Guardian)

Nationalism v internationalism Gideon Rachman on the rise of Donald Trump, Marine Le Pen’s electoral setback and the Paris climate change deal. “The climate deal and the defeat of the National Front signified a good weekend for the globalists. But the victory of internationalists over nationalists cannot be assumed. On the contrary, nationalist forces are still gaining strength in Europe, Russia, the US and east Asia.” (FT)

The moral failure of computer scientists In the 1950s, a group of scientists spoke out against the dangers of nuclear weapons. Now, should cryptographers be obliged to take on the surveillance state? (The Atlantic)

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