Joni Mitchell, Dolly Parton, Harry Styles and co support the MusiCares Charity 

In the run up to the 64th annual Grammy Awards ceremony in April, LA auction house Julien’s will host a major sale of music memorabilia. Star lots include an original painting of Jimi Hendrix by Joni Mitchell (estimate $2,000 to $4,000), a beaded dress worn by Dolly Parton ($2,000 to $4,000) and signed guitars from the likes of Paul McCartney ($4,000 to $6,000), Tom Petty ($6,000 to $8,000) and Harry Styles ($3,000 to $5,000).

A signed copy of Harry Styles’s single “Watermelon Sugar”, on sale along with a signed Gibson electric acoustic guitar (estimate $3,000 to $5,000)
A signed copy of Harry Styles’s single “Watermelon Sugar”, on sale along with a signed Gibson electric acoustic guitar (estimate $3,000 to $5,000)
Joni Mitchell’s original portrait of Jimi Hendrix (estimate $2,000 to $4,000)
Joni Mitchell’s original portrait of Jimi Hendrix (estimate $2,000 to $4,000)

All proceeds will benefit MusiCares, a charity that provides the music community with medical, financial and emotional aid. 30 January, juliensauctions.com


Animal-inspired make-up raising funds for Africa’s giraffes

Chantecaille Giraffe Eye Quartet, £70
Chantecaille Giraffe Eye Quartet, £70

Husband-and-wife duo Julian and Stephanie Fennessy founded the Giraffe Conservation Foundation in response to Africa’s rapidly dwindling giraffe population – it’s now down 30 per cent since the 1990s. In support, beauty brand Chantecaille has launched a limited-edition make-up capsule (from £38), from which at least $50,000 will help protect wild giraffes throughout Africa. Three shades of glossy lipstick evoke Namibia’s natural landscape, while a neutral-toned eye palette is inspired by the spots of the giraffes themselves. chantecaille.co.uk


Special-edition sneakers for Virgil Abloh’s “Post-Modern” Scholarship Fund

Louis Vuitton x Nike Air Force 1s, bidding from $2,000
Louis Vuitton x Nike Air Force 1s, bidding from $2,000

The first Louis Vuitton x Nike Air Force 1s were unveiled in June last year, with no clues to when the collection might drop. Now, two months after the death of Virgil Abloh (LV’s artistic director of menswear since 2018) Sotheby’s New York will auction 200 limited-edition pairs, all proceeds from which will go to the Virgil Abloh “Post-Modern” Scholarship Fund for black fashion students. A stalwart of the Nike catalogue since 1982, Abloh’s coffee-hued Air Forces feature classic Vuitton monogramming, off-centre tongue tabs and the late designer’s signature Helvetica typography. Take yours home in a bright orange pilot case; bidding starts at $2,000. Until 8 February, sothebys.com


A Beatles-inspired watch set in aid of Nordoff Robbins

In 2016, Swiss watchmaker Raymond Weil released a limited-edition timepiece in partnership with Apple Corps, the media company set up by The Beatles in the late ’60s. A total of four watches have been released since then, each inspired by one of the band’s major studio albums: Help!, Abbey Road, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and Let It Be. Raymond Weil held back the first issue of each model, and now will offer them as a unique quartet, housed in a glossy wooden case (£16,000). All of the proceeds will be donated to music therapy charity Nordoff Robbins. raymond-weil.co.uk


Nine artists unite to tackle homelessness

For its latest charitable exhibit, London gallery Purslane has teamed up with Art City Works to launch Saturnalia, an online fundraiser featuring work by 9 emerging and mid-career artists. Inspired by the eponymous ancient Roman festival, the show conjures imagery of feasting and festivities, from Oriele Steiner’s dancing pub-goers (Shall We Get Another One?) to the mysterious beasts painted by Hira Gedikoglu. Twenty per cent of sales will go to Shelter’s efforts to end homelessness and bad housing across the UK. Until 31 January, artcityworks.com

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