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What would it take to defeat Donald Trump? Not, as writes Edward Luce in this week's column, the sort of Wall Street-friendly incremental reforms of the Clinton-Obama era.

Ed argues that whoever wins the Democratic nomination and runs against Mr Trump in 2020 will be speaking for a radicalised party. And as the candidates sweep away the “mindset of systematic caution” that has characterised the Democrats since the late 1980s, they owe a debt of gratitude to Mr Trump, the disrupter-in-chief. Why? Because he “changed the weather”, writes Ed. “He showed that you could bamboozle a hostile establishment and still win an election.”

For the first time in decades, he sees intellectual energy on the left: the question is, will it prove to be like the Franklin Roosevelt era, with its transformative New Deal, or the false dawn of George McGovern, who lost to Richard Nixon?

Wolfgang Munchau believes the EU should make the decision before British MPs simpler by killing off the possibility of a Brexit reversal

Anjana Ahuja explains the enduring appeal of the periodic table as we mark its birth this year

Carlos Nicholas Fernandes, a technology investor and public policy adviser in Singapore, believes that Big Tech must be held to account over user consent, ending the “lie” of terms and conditions

Gavyn Davies explores the relationship between bear markets and recessions, “the terrible twins”

Nick Butler argues for a complete rethink of UK energy policy as Hitachi reconsiders its deal to run the Wylfa nuclear reactor

Catherine Haddon of the Institute for Government outlines the ways in which the UK parliament is taking back control of the Brexit process

What you’ve been saying

Landed with the bill, letter from Peter B Lawson, Hertfordshire, UK about the FT Life and Arts interview with Gwyneth Paltrow

Jo Ellison was clearly overwhelmed to take such a luminary to lunch ( January 5).I reckon the bill was £99 not the £130.94 shown as the total. Or was there a 30% tip in line with some in the USA? As the accountant I am always given the bill to audit when out with friends.Please let Miss Paltrow know of my services in that area.

In response to “ Liberalism’s most brilliant enemy is back in vogue”, Saint Mungo says:

The funny thing is, it’s the post WW2 liberal order in the Western world that has given us peace for so long that so many populists today have forgotten the dangers of far left & far right politics. A classic case of victim of its own success.

Take three lessons from Kay to invest wisely, letter from Richard Price, Trumpington, Cambs, UK

Merryn Somerset Webb asks “How many books do we need on financial advice?” ( January 4). I suggest a simple answer. Read one short book; The Long and the Short of It: A guide to finance and investment for normally intelligent people who aren’t in the industry, by the FT’s own John Kay and become an “intelligent investor” by taking three simple lessons from it: “pay less, diversify more and be contrarian”.

Today’s opinion

Inside Business: The real problem for carmakers isn’t Brexit or China; it’s weight
Under pressure to increase sales, manufacturers have added gizmos like driving aids

The FT View: Congo’s constitutional court should reject the country’s fraudulent election
But in its messy way, the vote represents a move towards democracy

Big Tech must be held to account over user consent
End the free-for-all by exposing the ‘lie’ over terms and conditions

After Wylfa — the case for an independent review of UK energy policy
Hitachi’s withdrawal would mark the collapse of the strategy adopted in 2013

Marking the birth of the periodic table
The dream of its founder, Dmitri Mendeleev, lives on in chemistry today

The Clinton-Obama era ends as US Democrats seek a radical new voice
The party owes a debt of gratitude to Donald Trump as it sweeps away a cautious mindset

The EU should kill off the UK’s chance of delaying Brexit
For Theresa May’s deal to pass, Brussels must remove the option of stalling Article 50

Recessions and bear markets — the terrible twins
A global recession is unlikely this year, unless a bear market causes one

Small Talk — Companies: Challenge for Britain’s grocers remains the rise of discounters
Brighton Pier Group rails against a very British problem

The FT View: A post-Brexit UK must be competitive above all
Ensuring the competition regulator is in good shape is a top priority

FT View

The FT View: Congo’s constitutional court should reject the country’s fraudulent election
But in its messy way, the vote represents a move towards democracy

The FT View: A post-Brexit UK must be competitive above all
Ensuring the competition regulator is in good shape is a top priority

The Big Read

The Big Read: Brexit brinkmanship: playing chicken over Theresa May’s deal
Failure to win Commons approval will intensify the brinkmanship that has left all sides believing they can secure their own outcome

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