Donald Trump’s first 100 days — market response in numbers

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President Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office, which officially conclude this weekend, have been nothing if not eventful both for politicos in Washington and investors on Wall Street.

fastFT has rounded up a few key data points for market watchers. Also, don’t miss the FT’s timeline of all the major market-moving events during this period.

$1tn – The increase in market value in the MSCI USA index, which tracks 627 large-and-mid cap US companies.

5.3 per cent – The rise in the S&P 500 index, America’s benchmark equities gauge. That comes on top of a 5.8 per cent rally between Mr Trump’s election in November and his inauguration in January.

23 basis points - The difference between the mid-March high in the yield on Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s broad US Treasuries index and its closing value on Thursday of this week.

The spread between the two figures highlights the recent cooling in expectations, at least in the near-term, that Mr Trump will be able to push plans through Congress that ignite higher levels of economic growth and inflation. (1 basis point is 0.01 percentage point).

3.09 (or 16.4 per cent) - The Mexican peso rallied against the dollar, a counter-intuitive move given Mr Trump’s heated rhetoric on the country. Investors have grown less anxious, however, that some of the businessman turned politician’s harshest plans will actually be enacted.

One buck gets you 3.09 fewer pesos than it did on the day before the inauguration. A gain of 16.4 per cent for the peso.

3.38 (or 2.5 per cent) - America’s neighbour to the north has had a rougher go at it, given concerns over what will happen to the North American Free Trade Agreement. A dollar gets you 3.38 more Canadian cents than it did on January 19. That’s a drop of 2.5 per cent for the loonie.

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