Six chief executives on our election panel share their views on regulation, tax, transport, skills shortages and who they are planning to vote for with FT business correspondent Jonathan Moules.

The transport business

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John Allan, chief executive of Exel, a global logistics company, says the government should take a more cautious approach to the implementation of Brussels regulations.

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The manufacturer

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Stuart Fell, chairman of West Bromwich Tool Engineering, says the government should assess the cost of new regulations and that employers should have greater involvement in setting the agenda for vocational training.

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The entrepreneur

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Ben Tisdall, who set up Speed Dater with Simon Prockter, his business partner, in 2002, believes current levels of migration allow for a flexible labour market and are good for business, but would like to see more investment in public transport.

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The technology company

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Alastair Crawford, chief executive of 192.com, the online directory service, says companies have to fill in too many forms to access government funds for training and that they have too much difficulty accessing the courts.

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The retailer

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Geoff Marshall, chairman of The Natural World retail chain would like to see the introduction of professional qualifications for the sector and favours greater regulation of no-win-no-fee legal firms, which ‘encourage a litigious culture in the workplace’.

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The farmer

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Grant Burton, farmer, says officials should spend more time with the industries they regulate and would like to see more encouragement for the consumption of local goods in order to help reduce commercial traffic on the roads.

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