Peter Martin fellowship

The FT is offering a four-month internship in the memory of Peter Martin

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For the final time, the Financial Times is offering a four-month internship in the memory of Peter Martin, the FT’s former chief business columnist and deputy editor, who died in August 2002 at the early age of 54. The Financial Times has been incredibly proud to offer this fellowship in memory of a much loved and respected colleague.

Peter was one of the very best business writers of his generation. He made an outstanding contribution to the Financial Times with his ideas, wit and humanity. As well as writing columns that sparkled with original insight, he played a key role in the international development of the paper and in the conception and expansion of its online presence with FT.com.

The successful candidate will join the leader-writing team of the FT in London for four months, during the summer of 2017. We are looking for someone with an excellent grounding in economics, business or finance, a capacity for original thinking and an ability to write fluently and accessibly for a well-informed but non-professional readership.

Candidates should already have a good first degree; post-graduate qualifications in a relevant subject would be a bonus. Applicants should also have a strong interest in subjects that especially interested Peter: business and, in particular, the economic impact of technological change.

The successful candidate will work under the supervision of Martin Wolf, Chief Economics Commentator, and Robert Armstrong, Chief Leader Writer. A bursary of £7,000 to cover travel and accommodation will be made. Applicants must be eligible to work in the EU.

Candidates should email a CV and a draft editorial of 500 words on an economics or business topic, to pmfellow@ft.com. The closing date for applications is 30 May 2017.

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