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FT Executive Appointments launched its weekly haiku/senryu contest in 2014. Winning poems covering specific workplace-related topics are published in the section on Thursdays.

The haiku is a powerful poetic form, in three lines of 5, 7 and 5 syllables. David Lanoue, haiku poet and author, defines it as: “A one-breath poem that discovers connection,” and thinks of a senryu as a comic haiku. Keeping this in mind while you write will help you.

To enter, find the current topic in each week’s Executive Appointments and send your poems on that topic to workplace.haiku@ft.com

Judging methodology

The best examples of haiku will be narrowed down by FT editors, with a guest judge picking the winner each week. Judges have been nominated by British Haiku Society, the World Haiku Association, the Haiku Foundation and Poet in the City.

It is important the poem entered is in the form and spirit of the haiku/senryu and that it pertains to the week’s topic. However, many of our judges warn against seeing this as simply a syllable counting exercise.

Usually competition entrants can submit up to 10 poems each week, though during the FT’s collaboration with Poet in the City from April 16-May 11, 2015, poets will be allowed to enter only one poem per topic. Entries must be previously unpublished and the writer’s own work. The copyright remains that of the author, but submission is an automatic agreement to allow the FT to publish the poem in the newspaper, on its website and in various social media channels. During the collaboration with Poet in the City, winning poems and runners up will also become part of the charity’s May 11 Haiku event.

For more details, including the terms and conditions, go to www.ft.com/haiku

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