Technophile: Gerhard Florin, Electronic Arts

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What do you think?

Gerhard Florin, executive vice president and general manager for International Publishing, Electronic Arts

What’s in your pocket? A mobile phone, of course, which I also use for taking photos and playing games. The experience of mobile gaming is getting better and better. Also my BlackBerry – but that device is a double-edged sword, a huge help and a curse at the same time.

First crush? My first calculator in 1974, which replaced the abacus.

True Love? It is hard to judge, but feels like a tight race in-between an Ipod micro, PSP and X-Box 360.

Latest squeeze? I just bought a Sony Cybershot camera – it fits in less than a pocket, and the image quality is the best I’ve seen.

What makes you mad? Teeny, little, phone-like keyboards on handheld devices with triple key functions that make it complicated to type notes or e-mail.

What’s your biggest tech disaster/most embarrassing moment? Let’s just say that sometimes video conferencing from home can catch you off guard.

What would you most love to see? A dedicated section on gaming in the FT in the culture/entertainment pages – and not only in the business section.

If money was no object? A time machine to get me around the world to the over 40 locations I look after worldwide.

PC or Mac? I’m torn – PC for me, but Mac for our creative teams in the studio.

Linux or Windows? Windows

Google or not? Google is a great tool – especially for looking up old classmates.

How wrong have you been? I predicted in 1992 that the gaming technology would reach the technology “peak of perfection” in the year 2000.

Company to watch? The small, in-the-garage shops that are busy making the next killer game as we speak. More generally, Korea and China, and broadband based online gaming.

Leftfield technology – what’s going to come out of nowhere? Same as above!

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