Obama speaks out on Brexit, when doves cry and kosher cocktails

US president warns UK will be less able to deal with economic shocks

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Barack Obama has arrived in Britain with a forthright warning that the UK would be less able to deal with economic shocks, terrorism and the migration crisis if it leaves the EU.

The US president will use his three-day visit to urge British voters to embrace “the remarkable legacy” of the EU in building peace since the second world war, a message which has infuriated Brexit campaigners. Meanwhile, investment in central London office buildings dropped by 52 per cent quarter on quarter as dealmaking was slowed by nervousness over a possible Brexit vote, (FT)

In the news

Alphabet shares dive 7% after results released Net profits at the parent company of Google, YouTube and Nest rose 20 per cent to $4.2bn but adjusted earnings, came in at $7.50 a share, missing estimates of $7.96. Cost per click — a closely watched measure of ad pricing — fell 9 per cent, with the decline even sharper at 12 per cent on Google’s own websites, which include search. (FT)

Daimler opens emissions investigation The owner of Mercedes-Benz has opened an investigation into “possible indications of irregularities” in its emissions at the request of the US Department of Justice. Earlier, Volkswagen agreed to purchase almost half a million vehicles that contained test-cheating defeat devices as part of a deal with US regulators outlined in a California court. (FT)

Uber settles suit The ride-hailing service has taken a crucial step towards clearing the legal uncertainties of its business model, agreeing to pay as much as $100m to drivers in California and Massachusetts to settle a class-action lawsuit. The settlement allows Uber to maintain its drivers’ status as independent contractors. (FT)

Prince dead at 57 Over the course of his 35-plus-year career, the flamboyant singer, songwriter and performer transformed musical genres from funk to soul to rock, while playing with concepts of race, gender and sexuality (and pretty much every instrument on most of the 39 albums he put out). Celebrate this thing called life with this full concert from 1982 and his legendary performance of “Purple Rain” in a rainstorm at the Super Bowl in 2007. (FT, Vulture, Veoh)

SunEdison’s ambitions end in bankruptcy The world’s largest renewable energy developer filed for bankruptcy protection in the US, bringing an end to its ambitious, debt-fuelled bid to become a solar and wind power “supermajor”. Here’s a deep dive into how it fell apart. (FT)

FBI paid more than $1.4m for iPhone hack The FBI paid more than $1.4m to hackers who developed a way to gain access to the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino attackers, leading the law enforcement agency to drop litigation against Apple intended to force the company to help break into the device. (FT) 

It’s a big day for

The global climate World leaders are set to sign a major climate agreement at the UN headquarters in New York — but can they deliver on their promises to fight global warming? Doubts remain and much has changed since nearly 200 countries struck the deal in December. (NYT, FT)

Food for thought

Brexit may break the Tory party The FT’s Philip Stephens writes about why the battle raging between Conservatives over the fate of the UK's place in the EU may portend their doom. (FT)

The secret shame of middle-class Americans Nearly half of Americans say they would have trouble coming up with $400 in an emergency. Neal Gabler is one of them. (The Atlantic)

Have there been more celebrity deaths in 2016 than usual? Last week Radio 4 set out to answer a question that's all the more relevant in light of Prince's death. (BBC)

Crafting a kosher cocktail during Passover Only the most serious enthusiasts tackle “liquid Seders,” but they’re part of a broader trend: finding ways to craft Passover-proof cocktails that adhere to the dietary limitations of the holiday. (WSJ)

Video of the day

The oil keeps gushing John Authers explains why the oil price keeps rising, despite confusion at Opec and high US inventories. (FT)

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