Geographical burden: Cases are on the increase, yet many millions remain undiagnosed

The 2014 edition of the World Diabetes Atlas estimates that there have been a further 5m cases of diabetes including 4m that are undiagnosed

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The geographical burden of diabetes varies around the world, but the trend is clear: the number of people affected is high and continues to rise. 

Poor diet, too little physical activity and rising life expectancy point to a sharp increase in the cost to healthcare systems in the years to come.

Very few countries, notably Japan, have shown a slight decline in prevalence, but the International Diabetes Federation suggests any reductions are more a reflection of the increasing accuracy of predictions than any sign of a reversal in the condition.

More than three-quarters of cases globally are in low and middle income countries, led by China and India. The US remains the country with the third largest number of cases. Even since last year, the 2014 edition of the World Diabetes Atlas estimates that there have been a further 5m cases of diabetes including 4m that are undiagnosed.

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