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Human beings will have to alter their behaviour very quickly if they wish to have any chance of limiting the global average temperature rise to less than 1.5C above pre-industrial levels. Life on earth will continue if that limit is ignored, but, argues Martin Wolf in his column this week, not as we know it.

The world urgently needs to shift to a different investment and growth path, Martin argues. Given that this is technically feasible, inaction ought not to be an option. The problem, he concludes, is that in a nationalistic world, the prospects for the kind of co-operation required are vanishingly small.

Responding to anxieties about his country’s economic slowdown, South African president Cyril Ramaphosa announces a wide-ranging series of reforms designed to attract foreign investment.

Brooke Masters examines the fight over data roiling Wall Street between the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq, on the one hand, and the US’s biggest brokers on the other.

Courtney Weaver writes that, as America approaches the midterm elections, partisan feuds are splitting some of the country’s most prominent political families.

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What you’ve been saying

Marchers must surely have moved the dial: letter from Steven Fogel, London, UK

On Saturday I marched through London with a crowd whose huge number must have moved the dial, even if slightly, towards making it politically acceptable to consider formally revisiting national opinion. Just as plans are being made for a hard Brexit, would it not be wise for the government to set up a team to frame plans and wording for a second referendum should the government or parliament later require another people’s vote?

In response to “Donald Trump embodies the spirit of our age”, Funnymoney says:

Indeed, Trump is the perfect lightning rod for all the unhappy Americans of our age. The only thing I can’t quite recall is, in the midst of a glorious economic boom such as this one, have there always been so many unhappy people?

The list of failures over Israel and Palestine is a long one: letter from Rob Buist, Randwick, NSW, Australia

I very much enjoyed Richard Haass’s insightful op-ed on Saudi Arabia ( “The US must shed its illusions about Saudi Arabia’s crown prince”). However his list of criticisms of Saudi Arabia includes “the Saudis failed to bring Israelis and Palestinians together”. Excuse me? Such failure is shared by the US, most of Europe, Egypt and Jordan. Individuals who have failed include Henry Kissinger, Bill Clinton, Tony Blair and a host of others.

Today’s opinion

Republican-Democrat family feuds become louder in the Trump era
Twitter quarrels among parents, children and siblings reflect the national mood

American men should find the courage to reject machismo
What matters is the strength to stand up to peer pressure and forge a path of equality

South Africa must translate political freedom into prosperity
Improved infrastructure and stable public finances can attract foreign investment

There is a fight over data brewing on Wall Street
Nasdaq and the New York Stock Exchange have long profited as aggregators

Brexit threatens international scientists in the UK like me
Researchers at London’s Crick Institute risk their careers by staying in the country

FT Alphaville: Americans can’t quit cash

Inaction over climate change is shameful
We need to shift the world on to a different investment and growth path immediately

FT View

The FT View: Roman theatre clashes with the EU rule book
The dispute over Italy’s budget risks sparking severe market turmoil

The FT View: Donald Trump strikes a blow against nuclear stability
US withdrawal from the INF treaty is a danger to European allies

The Big Read

The Big Read: Can Germany survive the ‘iPhone moment’ for cars?
The country’s profitable carmakers are being hit quicker than expected by the adoption of electric vehicles and diesel bans

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