• Xi Zhongxun, father of Chinese president Xi Jinping, served a single term in the elite politburo. An article on August 11 wrongly stated he had not risen higher than leader of a province.

  • A photograph accompanying an article on August 3 about student protests in China in support of trade unions was of a demonstration in Hong Kong, not Beijing as wrongly captioned.

  • Bruce Ratner was commissioner of the department of consumer affairs under New York Mayor Ed Koch, not commissioner of public affairs, as wrongly stated in an article on August 6.

  • Bill Erbey, founder and former chairman of Ocwen Financial, has claimed Ocwen was subject to a smear campaign led by Pimco and BlackRock. The allegation was not made by Ocwen itself, as wrongly stated in a headline on August 6.

  • Marc Effron’s book referred to in an article on hard work on August 6 is called Eight Steps to High Performance, not Work Smarter, Not Harder, as wrongly stated.

  • Lu Weiting is chief executive of Cuimi Technology, not Weimi Technology as wrongly stated in an article on Chinese consumer debt on August 6.

  • A review of the song was written by Helen Barrett, and not Helen Wallace as incorrectly stated in an article on July 28

  • The businessman did not attend a 1995 meeting between Vitol and the Serbian electric authority

  • Richard Gates, former deputy chair of the Trump campaign, pleaded guilty to conspiracy and making a false statement, and not for failure to register as a foreign agent as incorrectly stated in an article on August 1.

  • Promoted Content
  • Reach, formerly known as Trinity Mirror, acquired the Daily Express and Daily Star newspapers, and not the Wolverhampton-based Express & Star as incorrectly stated in an article on July 31.

  • Pemex plans to increase oil production by 600,000 barrels a day in two years, not 600m b/d as incorrectly stated in an article on July 30

  • Google has designed an AI chip to run in devices linked to “edge” computing, and not smartphones as incorrectly stated in a column on July 27.

  • The amount spent on the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s teaching programme was about $500m, and not $1bn as incorrectly stated in an FT Money column

  • A rightwing veterans group installed a plaque bearing a fascist wartime slogan at Jasenovac in Croatia, and not government officials as incorrectly stated in an article on July 21

  • The US has refused to talk to the Taliban ever since the Afghan government failed to hand over al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, not former Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omaras wrongly stated in an editorial comment on July 23.

  • The Sars epidemic in China began in 2002, not 2005 as incorrectly stated in an article in today’s Magazine

  • A quote by John Gerspach, Citigroup’s chief financial officer, about higher interest rates and consumer deposits was misattributed to Michael Corbat, Citi’s chief executive, in an article on July 14.

  • Amazon’s market capitalisation rose above $900bn, not $900m as incorrectly stated in an article on July 19.

  • Kevin Burns was chief operating officer of Chobani, not chief executive as incorrectly stated in an article on July 11.

  • China’s National People’s Congress meeting that ended term limits for Chinese presidents occurred in March, not October as incorrectly stated in an article on July 13.

  • There are 14 stations of the cross, not 12, as incorrectly stated in an article on July 13

  • John Gerspach is Citigroup’s chief financial officer, not the US bank’s chief executive as incorrectly stated in an article on July 9.

  • Horst Seehofer is Germany’s interior minister. He is no longer Bavaria’s prime minister as incorrectly stated in an article on July 7.

  • Emerging markets sold $15bn of syndicated bonds in June, rather than $2bn, and $132.7bn in the second quarter, rather than $49bn, as incorrectly stated in an article on July 6.

  • The US has imposed tariffs against China that affect $613m worth of chips, not $250m as incorrectly stated in an article on July 5