• The Seaside Community Development Corporation is a for-profit enterprise, not a not-for-profit organisation as wrongly stated in an article about the Florida town in Life & Arts on May 19

  • Ant Financial has not yet closed its $10bn fundraising, as wrongly stated in an editorial on May 22

  • Ecuador last defaulted on its sovereign debt in 2008

  • Pharmacy chain CVS is buying insurer Aetna

  • The six-day Arab-Israeli war took place in 1967

  • Nestlé paid Starbucks $7.2bn for rights to distribute the US chain’s packaged coffee

  • The UK apprenticeship levy applies to businesses with an annual paybill of more than £3m, rather than those with annual revenues of more than £3m, as incorrectly stated in an article on May 9.

  • Nearly 17 per cent of the 2017 class of MBA students at NYU Stern School of Business became employed in the tech and telecoms sector, not 10 per cent as incorrectly stated in an article on May 7.

  • The last visits to Japan by a Chinese premier and Korean president were in 2011, not 2010 and 2012, as incorrectly stated in an article on May 9

  • Promoted Content
  • Morgan Stanley did not estimate that BT would cut 6,500 staff as incorrectly stated in an article on May 4

  • The Legatum Institute is a pro-Brexit think-tank, not an anti-Brexit think-tank as incorrectly stated in a front-page promotion panel on May 2

  • Confidence in Britain’s housing market is close to its lowest level in five years rather than at its lowest level as incorrectly stated in a Datawatch chart on May 2

  • Gillian Tett’s column in this weekend’s FT Magazine incorrectly states that the AIBRT research found that Yahoo and Bing did not offer negative suggestions about themselves and Google

  • John Bolton, the US’s national security adviser, has replaced much of his department’s staff with those who share his worldview, rather than President Donald Trump as incorrectly stated in a pull-out quote in the Opinion section on April 26

  • UK home secretary Amber Rudd said the government was still discussing whether to leave the EU customs union and not whether to leave the EU as incorrectly stated in an article on April 27

  • A professor at China’s Renmin University has been placed under investigation for inappropriate sexual conduct but has not been dismissed as incorrectly stated in an article on April 25.

  • The income level of the top 1 per cent of families in Connecticut is 73.7 times greater than families in the bottom 99 per cent, not 73.7 per cent more as incorrectly stated in the FT Big Read on April 25.

  • H&M and Inditex did not buy garments from workshops within the Rana Plaza complex in Bangladesh, as wrongly stated in an article on April 24

  • Sarah Sands’ column on Mozart did not appear in the international edition last weekend, despite appearing in the front page promotional panel

  • The US presidential election was in 2016, not 2017 as incorrectly stated in an article on April 14

  • A chart on the world’s largest listed airlines failed to include Ryanair

  • Credit Suisse’s ratio of Level 3 assets to tier one common equity is 47 per cent, not 4 per cent as incorrectly stated in a chart on April 4.

  • There is not a majority of Labour metro mayors as incorrectly stated in an editorial comment on April 5.

  • Investors trading contracts for difference in the UK are not exempt from capital gains tax as incorrectly stated in an FT Money article on March 31

  • Swiss authorities are assisting an Italian criminal investigation into a former employee of Kering, not the Italian probe into Gucci’s tax arrangements as incorrectly stated in a column on March 29