In this issue

With the Asian market yet to take off, Canada must put aside any friction with the US, its biggest oil and gas customer

Being a good neighbour remains key to prospects

With the Asian market yet to take off, Canada must put aside any friction with the US, its biggest oil and gas customer, writes Ed Crooks

Battle lines: The challenge facing exporters and producers

Pipeline troubles will not go away, says Robert Wright

Carbon capture: Investment pays off in the field of CCS

Canada invests over $2bn in ‘greener’ electricity generation, writes Pilita Clark

Natural gas: Asia beckons as promising market for LNG

Trans-Pacific plans raise hopes, says Michael Kavanagh

Oil sands: Environmental concerns come head-to-head with economics

Industry keeps up the fight despite the gains of the campaigners, says Ed Crooks

Arctic: Ice cap region offers cold comfort for oil explorers

Harsh, remote conditions and transport dangers deter investors, writes Robert Wright

Shale oil: Pockets beneath the prairies pose questions for developers

Tight oil may be a nascent growth story but things could yet take off, writes Sylvia Pfeifer

silhouette of an power plant

Shale gas: The ups and downs of a boom time

More oversight is needed, writes Michael Kavanagh

Canadian Pacific crude carrier in North Dakota

Transport: Shift to shale puts revitalised carrier on track for profit growth

Move from coal to new market has revived railway operator, writes Robert Wright

Political boundaries: Buyers chase gas across the border

Shale areas attract foreign interest, writes Ed Crooks