Congressional midterms

With the House already firmly in Republican hands, the party needs to win just six seats in the Senate to take full control of Congress in elections that will shape the landscape for the much higher-stakes race for the presidency in 2016

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 29: An American flag waves outside the United States Capitol building as Congress remains gridlocked over legislation to continue funding the federal government September 29, 2013 in Washington, DC. The House of Representatives passed a continuing resolution with language to defund U.S. President Barack Obama's national health care plan yesterday, but Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has indicated the U.S. Senate will not consider the legislation as passed by the House. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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US billionaires beat campaign cash rules

‘Common good’ proves to be malleable concept

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US Senate Election 2014
Find out more about the key US Senate races
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US midterms and their longer term repercussions
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Illinois woes leave governor race wide open

Federal probes offer hope to GOP in Democratic stronghold

US midterm elections

US election will be won at the letterbox

Republicans say voting by mail encourages fraud

Republicans look to lock up the House

The party could cement control of the chamber for years

Democrats battle sour economic mood

The US economy is growing but incomes are not

Go slow on pot, says Colorado governor

Hickenlooper says think twice before following his state’s lead

Political apathy: who cares?

Voters apparently feel considerably more positively towards cockroaches, traffic jams or colonoscopies than congressmen

Democrats feel Senate is slipping away

Disillusionment with Obama and tepid economic recovery fuel race

Tea Party favourites struggle to keep grip

Voters balk at cuts and policies that fail to deliver growth

Political landscape shifts in US south

Social issues and race politics are changing allegiances

Matt Kenyon
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Jimmy Carter flashback – US midterms malaise

Leaders do not lead. Institutions repeatedly fail and no one seems to be held accountable

US gavel and flag lawyers judges
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Lawyers sit on their cash this election

Democrats are starved of funds from key donor group

Google passes Goldman in US donations

Tech giant spends more money on midterm political campaigns

Ebola crisis wades into poll campaign

White House faces tough questions over how workers were infected

Fear and loathing in the land of the free

The GOP may be the ugly party but the one whose symbol is, appropriately, a donkey is mulish

Democrats just love Obama for his money

President is toxic on the congressional campaign trail

Kansas shows its independent streak

Greg Orman is a wild card in next month’s congressional elections

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 29: An American flag waves outside the United States Capitol building as Congress remains gridlocked over legislation to continue funding the federal government September 29, 2013 in Washington, DC. The House of Representatives passed a continuing resolution with language to defund U.S. President Barack Obama's national health care plan yesterday, but Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has indicated the U.S. Senate will not consider the legislation as passed by the House. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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US midterm tantrums fail to stir voters

Record sums of money chase an ever-dwindling pool of swing voters

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US midterms will have limited impact

Investment in real economy must come from private sector

Independent takes strong lead in Kansas

Greg Orman could stop the Republicans seizing the Senate

Republicans raise Isis fears in election

Candidates attack Obama over terror policy in campaign ads

A gaffe is forever on US campaign trail

Rival ‘trackers’ record every word political candidates utter

Business puts its cash behind Republicans

Chamber of Commerce spends $30m on midterms campaign

Obama’s grass roots advantage under threat

Democrats can no longer rely on superior campaigning

Banks hope for ballot blow to Dodd-Frank

A Republican Senate is expected to revisit financial reforms

Crowdpac helps politicians tap the crowd

Former Downing Street policy guru matches donors to candidates

US campaign teams fight for small donors

Democrats and Republicans diverge in pursuit of online funding

A great midterm anomaly

Political gridlock is great for shares

US midterms: At arm’s length

Republicans see the election as a referendum on Obama and even Democrats are distancing themselves from him

US midterms will not break the deadlock

Sharp differences between the parties have morphed into tribalism, writes Norman Ornstein

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