In this issue

The time for talk is over: Europe’s politicians need to act fast in order to solve the ongoing financial crisis in the eurozone

Actions need to speak louder than words

The forum should move beyond rhetoric and use its influence to broker practical solutions to the world’s economic woes, writes Patrick Jenkins

Agenda

Seb Morton-Clark, Patrick Jenkins, Chris Giles, and Gideon Rachman
FT’s Davos aficionados on the likely issues
A selection of business leaders, politicians and NGOs on what to expect
Davos 2012 ©Getty
WEF: Davos 2012. News, commentary and analysis
Gillian Tett

The blame game

The US fears its fragile economic recovery is under threat, says Gillian Tett

Protect and promote

The UK should mend fences with Europe and make new emerging market allies, writes Jonathan Ford

Martin Wolf

Confronting follies

Martin Wolf considers the eurozone’s changing fortunes

Northern exposure

The role emerging economies play in the global economy is set to increase, writes Arkady Dvorkovich

The economics of politics

Changes in leadership and regimes will be watched closely, writes Gideon Rachman

Live blog

  • White House Countdown – The Democratic dream team?

    Sign up for our daily US politics newsletter here.

    Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren offered up a preview of what a dream ticket for many Democrats might look like with their first joint campaign appearance in Cincinnati, offering up a steady diet of economic populism mixed with enthusiastic takedowns of Donald Trump.

    Warren has emerged as the Clinton campaign’s chief attack dog on Trump. And though the left-wing senator has in the past found herself at odds with Clinton – and her husband’s deregulation of Wall Street, in particular – on Monday she did not disappoint, calling Trump a “small insecure money grubber who fights for no one but himself” and a “thin-skinned bully”. My colleague Courtney Weaver has a run-down of the rally.

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  • FT column: I do not believe that Brexit will happen

    By Gideon Rachman

    All good dramas involve the suspension of disbelief. So it was with Brexit. I went to bed at 4am on Friday depressed that Britain had voted to leave the EU. The following day my gloom only deepened. But then, belatedly, I realised that I have seen this film before. I know how it ends. And it does not end with the UK leaving Europe.

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  • Brexorcism

    Just a few months ago the idea that Britons would vote to leave the EU seemed implausible. But to the shock of the world, that’s what they just did. A short while back the idea of Donald Trump as president seemed equally inconceivable. Does the Brexit vote tell us we should now upgrade the odds of him winning?

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The east also rises

Asian economies are doing well, but power has not quite shifted from the west, says Henny Sender

The new model leaders

Outdated approaches are not suited to a fast-paced world, says Klaus Schwab

Chris Giles

Pride before a fall

Chris Giles warns against the dangers of complacency

Strategic balance

Shifting power demands leadership, says David Miliband

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