In this issue

The time for talk is over: Europe’s politicians need to act fast in order to solve the ongoing financial crisis in the eurozone

Actions need to speak louder than words

The forum should move beyond rhetoric and use its influence to broker practical solutions to the world’s economic woes, writes Patrick Jenkins

Agenda

Seb Morton-Clark, Patrick Jenkins, Chris Giles, and Gideon Rachman
FT’s Davos aficionados on the likely issues
A selection of business leaders, politicians and NGOs on what to expect
Davos 2012 ©Getty
WEF: Davos 2012. News, commentary and analysis
Gillian Tett

The blame game

The US fears its fragile economic recovery is under threat, says Gillian Tett

Protect and promote

The UK should mend fences with Europe and make new emerging market allies, writes Jonathan Ford

Martin Wolf

Confronting follies

Martin Wolf considers the eurozone’s changing fortunes

Northern exposure

The role emerging economies play in the global economy is set to increase, writes Arkady Dvorkovich

The economics of politics

Changes in leadership and regimes will be watched closely, writes Gideon Rachman

Live blog

  • Ukraine’s hybrid peace

    Predictions that the war in Ukraine might be past its worst point can only be advanced with caution and caveats. Over the past 18 months, the western world has been consistently surprised by unexpected escalations and brutal events – from the annexation of Crimea to the shooting down of flight MH17 over eastern Ukraine. Even now, fighting continues. Last week, saw an escalation of conflict around Donetsk, with six killed in one day.

    And yet, for all that, a cautious optimism is growing in the west that the fighting may be past its worst. There are still armed militias on the ground and intermittent fighting continues. But, against expectations, the Minsk peace accords negotiated last February, seem to have succeeded in damping down the conflict. One well-placed EU diplomat calls the new situation, a “hybrid peace” – a play on the well-known idea that Russia is fighting a hybrid war.

    Read more
  • Taking the blame for the post-crash blues

    Three weeks to go until the UK general election, and whatever the result – most likely no party with an overall majority in parliament – the remarkable thing is the serious underperformance of the ruling Conservatives.

    The Conservatives inherited a nascent economic recovery in 2010 from a desperately unpopular Labour government that had been in power for thirteen years, and, despite questionable economic policies such as excessive austerity, narrowly managed not to screw it up.

    But instead of building on their modest 36.1 per cent vote share in 2010, which forced them to form a coalition with the Liberal Democrats, polls now show the Tories struggling to break above 35 per cent.

    Read more
  • FT podcast: World Weekly with Gideon Rachman
    Read more

The east also rises

Asian economies are doing well, but power has not quite shifted from the west, says Henny Sender

The new model leaders

Outdated approaches are not suited to a fast-paced world, says Klaus Schwab

Chris Giles

Pride before a fall

Chris Giles warns against the dangers of complacency

Strategic balance

Shifting power demands leadership, says David Miliband

SHARE THIS QUOTE