In this issue

The time for talk is over: Europe’s politicians need to act fast in order to solve the ongoing financial crisis in the eurozone

Actions need to speak louder than words

The forum should move beyond rhetoric and use its influence to broker practical solutions to the world’s economic woes, writes Patrick Jenkins

Agenda

Seb Morton-Clark, Patrick Jenkins, Chris Giles, and Gideon Rachman
FT’s Davos aficionados on the likely issues
A selection of business leaders, politicians and NGOs on what to expect
Davos 2012 ©Getty
WEF: Davos 2012. News, commentary and analysis
Gillian Tett

The blame game

The US fears its fragile economic recovery is under threat, says Gillian Tett

Protect and promote

The UK should mend fences with Europe and make new emerging market allies, writes Jonathan Ford

Martin Wolf

Confronting follies

Martin Wolf considers the eurozone’s changing fortunes

Northern exposure

The role emerging economies play in the global economy is set to increase, writes Arkady Dvorkovich

The economics of politics

Changes in leadership and regimes will be watched closely, writes Gideon Rachman

Live blog

  • Greece: in search of the perfect job market

    The stable of fictitious beasts from Greek mythology acquired a new inmate this week, unveiled in the letter from the Syriza government proposing economic reforms to keep the country’s bailout going. Yanis Varoufakis, the finance minister, has bravely set off in search of that wondrous creature: “EU best practice across the range of labour market legislation”.

    Read more
  • FT podcast: World Weekly with Gideon Rachman
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  • Five dangerous weeks for Nigeria

    The postponement of Nigeria’s presidential elections on security grounds has flushed into the open scenarios reminiscent of the dark days when the country’s democratic aspirations were stifled by a military cabal. The polls will take place against a backdrop of regional and ethnic tensions, with the ruling Peoples Democratic party up against a well organised opposition. A free and fair vote could lead to the country’s first constitutional transfer of power, an event that, if handled peacefully, would not only further Nigeria’s political evolution, but provide a fillip to democracy across the continent.

    If, on the other hand, the constitutional process is disrupted at the first sign of a real political contest since the restoration of civilian rule in 1999, it would set back democratic progress by years and potentially trigger chaos, civil society groups and prominent leaders including former president Olusegun Obasanjo warn. Amid the uncertainty, several possible scenarios are emerging.

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The east also rises

Asian economies are doing well, but power has not quite shifted from the west, says Henny Sender

The new model leaders

Outdated approaches are not suited to a fast-paced world, says Klaus Schwab

Chris Giles

Pride before a fall

Chris Giles warns against the dangers of complacency

Strategic balance

Shifting power demands leadership, says David Miliband

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