May 22, 2014 11:43 am

Oxford MBA to focus on global issues and effective leadership

PeterTufano, Professor of Finance at Sa•d Business School, University of Oxford, at his home in the city. 09/08/2013...photo by Sam Frost...©2013...phone +44 (0)7790 900704..email sam@samfrostphotos.com...©Sam Frost

Peter Tufano, dean of Saïd Oxford

The University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School has revamped its MBA and will be launching the new programme from September.

The degree will encompass three main themes, says Saïd dean Peter Tufano. The first will be understanding big subjects – demography or water, for example, using Saïd’s Goto – Global Opportunities and Threats Oxford – platform. How to compete globally, understanding rules and regulation and social norms, will be the second theme – “an embedded take on globalisation”, as Prof Tufano calls it. The third theme will be effective and responsible leadership.

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The one-year programme will be extended to cram in all the work. Each of the three terms will be two weeks longer and there will be three extra weeks of pre-course work at the beginning. “In order to give them [MBA students] what they need in 12 months we need to be even more intense,” says Prof Tufano.

Since his appointment as dean at Saïd, Prof Tufano has worked to involve other University of Oxford departments much more closely and says there will be additional courses on the revamped degree where business professors will work with those from the humanities. “At the end of the day we have to relate to people as people.” On the new courses students can experience these issues as related by philosophers, artists and musicians, he says.

“Another case study they [MBA students] will expect,” he says. The unpredictable may give them a different perspective “and help them understand better”.

Entrepreneurial thinking will also run through the programme and all students will have a personal coach.

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