February 21, 2014 8:12 pm

Five of the best: Sunday lunches to share

From Cambridge to Cumbria, from ‘drunken’ roast duck to ham hock pie, here’s fare that’s just too good eat on your own
The Phoenix Inn

The Phoenix Inn

The Phoenix Inn

Sunday is no day of rest for Phoenix head chef and owner Andrew Ryder. Dishes to share on his menu include Côte de bœuf, a 500g Châteaubriand, or a whole roast chicken. All come with roasties, seasonal vegetables, Yorkshire pudding and gravy. Fixed sittings at 12pm, 3pm and 6pm mean that the large joints are cooked fresh, so booking is advised.

London Road, Phoenix Green, Hartley Wintney, Hampshire RG27 8RT; 01252 842484; phoenixinn.co.uk

Pint Shop

A permanent fixture on the menu of this contemporary British beer house is a whole beer-brined chicken, served with chips and curry butter. At the weekend, it’s joined by sharing dishes such as a whole roast stone bass, a giant 1kg Porterhouse steak and all the trimmings, or a huge ham hock pie and marrowfat peas. If you’re booking as a group, they’re happy to suggest a whole joint for the table rather than individual plates.

10 Peas Hill, Cambridge, CB2 3PN; 01223 352293; pintshop.co.uk

Trullo

A great neighbourhood restaurant featuring simple, smart Italian food. Sharing dishes are available some weekdays and on the popular set Sunday lunch menu (booking is recommended). Most recently the menu has featured the likes of 35-day-hung Dexter rib-eye steak cooked on a charcoal grill. This comes with wild mushrooms, crispy polenta and gorgonzola fonduta.

300-302 St Paul’s Road, London N1 2LH; 020 7226 2733; trullorestaurant.com

The Magdalen Arms

Run by former staff from London’s Anchor & Hope, the menu features such dishes for two as half a roast mustard rabbit with chips, a whole roast sea bass, and pot roast guinea fowl. Not to be missed, however, is the huge Angus steak and ale suet crust pie.

243 Iffley Rd, Oxford, OX4 1SJ; 01865 243159; magdalenarms.com

The Drunken Duck Inn

Head chef Jonny Watson’s menu features only one dish to share, a “drunken” roast duck. First, the legs are taken off and slow-cooked in duck fat overnight. The crown is then roasted after being basted in honey, butter and a touch of Szechuan pepper. A glug of beer from the brewery next door provides the drunken element. It’s carved in the kitchen and sent to table with a choice of sides, including duck fat roast potatoes and red cabbage.

Barngates, Ambleside, Cumbria LA22 0NG; 015394 36347; drunkenduckinn.co.uk

Andrew Webb is author of ‘Food Britannia’ (Random House)

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