November 12, 2007 4:45 pm

Professors rewarded for social and environmental work

In what can only be described as the Oscars of the business school world, eight of the world’s most socially-aware academics are to receive awards from the Aspen Institute Center for Business Education in New York on November 16.

This annual awards ceremony, now in its sixth year, rewards MBA faculty who have integrated social and environmental issues into academic research, educational programmes, and business practice.

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Two lifetime achievement awards will be given to Kirk Hanson, executive director of the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University, who has been a leader in encouraging American business schools to study corporate social responsibility, and Gregory Dees, founding director of the Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship at the Fuqua school at Duke University, who, among other things, launched an initiative to stimulate entrepreneurial activity in central Appalachia.

Other award winners will be: Carrie Leana, of the Katz school at the University of Pittsburgh, for academic leadership; Daniel Diermeier of Kellogg at Northwestern University for institutional impact; and David Cooperrider at the Weatherhead school at Case Western Reserve University and Warner Woodworth of Brigham Young’s Marriott school, both for external impact. Jeffrey Robinson of NYU Stern won the rising star award while Johanna Mair, of Iese Business School, was the only European in the line-up, winning the award for social entrepreneurship.

The 2007 European Faculty Pioneer Awards, given in conjunction with the European Academy of Business in Society, were presented in September at a ceremony in Barcelona. The winners were Chris Hope of the Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge, who received a lifetime achievement award, and André Sobczak from the French business school Audencia, in Nantes, who won the rising star award.

www.AspenCBE.org

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