June 22, 2012 7:38 pm

Barometer: Design

Stock up on your personal menagerie, for big and little children
Pig cutting board

Animal magic

 

Goldilocks and the Three Bears coat hooks

 
Flamingo

Flamingo

 
Fox and cubs lampshade

Fox and cubs lampshade

 
Brown rabbit and green cabbages deckchair

Brown rabbit and green cabbages deckchair

 
Pig cutting board

Pig cutting board

Goldilocks and the Three Bears coat hooks, £36, www.designedandmade.co.uk

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IN FT Magazine

Fox and cubs lampshade from £31, www.lushlampshades.co.uk

Brown rabbit and green cabbages deckchair, £125, www.thornbackandpeel.co.uk

Flamingo, £400 (34cm tall), abigailbrown.bigcartel.com

Pig cutting board, £24.40, mydeco.com

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Meet the studio

Jonathan Cleaver

Jonathan Cleaver

Is tapestry shaking off its dusty image? Grayson Perry’s current exhibition at Victoria Miro is a homage to William Hogarth in tapestry, while the Museum of Everything showed the pop art tapestries of outsider artist Ted Willcox, writes Lauren Cochrane. At Dovecot tapestry studio in Edinburgh, the only one of its kind still operating in the UK, Jonathan Cleaver, head weaver, has noticed a change. “In the last few years, artists have got more involved,” he says. Indeed, Dovecot has worked with graphic artist Peter Saville, and arts graduates are also showing interest in the studio’s apprenticeship scheme. “There’s a fascination with making,” says Cleaver. “And you need that here. You have to focus on one thing, one image, for several months at a time.”

Dovecot’s new exhibition, “Weaving the Century”, features work by artists Edward Wadsworth, Elizabeth Blackadder and Eduardo Paolozzi translated into rugs and tapestries. These pieces will be on display along with newer collaborations between the studio and Saville, Sir Peter Blake and Victoria Crowe. Abstract, figurative, bright and monochrome, they cover the gamut of modern artistic expression.

Tapestry by Sir Peter Blake

Tapestry by Sir Peter Blake

Established in 1912 by the Marquis of Bute, Dovecot was conceived to create pieces for his stately home, Mount Stuart.

From the beginning, however, artistic links were forged, with some of the first weavers recruited from William Morris’s studio. Cleaver believes the appeal for artists is Dovecot’s highly specialised rendering skills. “The tapestry technique is essentially the same as it was 2,000 years ago,” he says. It’s intensive work. On the loom for weeks, some pieces require all five full-time weavers. The large R.B. Kitaj piece in the foyer of The British Library took a year to produce. “We don’t use digital technology to match colours,” says Cleaver. “We do it all by eye.”

‘Weaving the Century’ runs at Dovecot Studio from July 13 to October 7, www.dovecotstudios.com

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