August 21, 2014 9:03 am

Top 10 MBA features of the academic year

From the struggling business education market in India to an interview with European royalty, these topics and more made it on to the Business Education team’s list of the top 10 features for the 2013/2014 academic year.

Which features are on your list? Share your thoughts in the comments section below or tweet @ftbized #FTMBA

1. India’s MBA dream loses some of its lustre

Although India has some of the world’s top business schools, in recent years hundreds of lesser quality programmes have been set up, leading to a bubble of oversupply in the management education market.

2. The Prince of Liechtenstein on leadership

Johannes Adam von und zu Liechtenstein descibes how studying at business school helped equip him to run a country.

3. Baffling business school names

FT Business Education Editor Della Bradshaw considers becoming a brand consultant after observing a rush in Europe for business schools to rebrand.

4. Wells Fargo chief’s rise to the top

FT West Coast Editor Richard Waters interviews John Stumpf on his journey from a Minnesota dairy and poultry farm to the Wells Fargo executive suite in San Francisco.

5. MBAs write an alternative school report

The FT Business Education team survey alumni from the top 100 schools in the FT 2014 Global MBA ranking, asking them to rate their former schools on criteria such as social life and pastoral care.

6. Moocs: Learning becomes a joy again

Having recently discovered Moocs - massive open online courses - FT World Desk News Editor Barney Thompson admits he has become a Mooc-aholic.

7. The business of reputation management

FT reporter Emma Boyde investigates the impact on business schools that come under public scrutiny because of the consulting activities of their professors.

8. Cities fail to make the grade in the classroom

With more than 2bn people expected to move to cities by 2050, urbanisation would seem to be a topic that business schools cannot ignore, but few have taken up the challenge.

9. Will CFA become the new MBA?

Some argue that students who have won the right to put the three letters CFA after their names have an advantage over those with an MBA.

10. A way into the hearts and minds of managers

Academics are using medical techniques to inform research and teaching in order to help executives become more effective and innovative.

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