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September 11, 2011 4:59 pm

Timeline: the future of communications

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In a time when we have video conversations over our mobile phones, watch 3D television broadcasts and join online social networks circling the planet, it is easy to forget how it all came to be, from the Phoenician alphabet and Sumerian writing, 3500BC to 2900BC, to the first postal service (China, in 900BC) or even the use of homing pigeons (Greece, 776 BC).

Even much more recent advances in communications technology have evolved quickly to become better, faster and more reliable, often in less than a century. The Gutenberg printing press in 1455, Morse code in 1835, Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone in 1876, the first TV signals in 1927 or even the birth of Arpanet, the first internet, in 1969 – all these achievements led the way to our modern-day communications devices.

And in 50 or 60 years from now, perhaps we will look back at the iPad as a quaint item that started a revolution in personal tablet computing, or we will think of 3D TV only as a small step towards immersive holographic video games. Our timeline explores a few futuristic expectations for the communications industry – and, as debatable as the timeframe may be, there is no doubt about the ever-faster growth of technology.

Also read our report on The Future of Communications

Additional research by Umu Lamina. Sources: 2012predictions.net; Technology Gadget News; Gartner; FutureTimeline.net; Newlaunches.com; Microsoft; Popular Science; Cisco; InfoWorld

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