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September 13, 2013 7:04 pm

‘Sonic’, Martin Klimas, 2011

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A series of photographs shows how paint splatters in response to full-volume broadcasts of a range of music

A slick of green and yellow paint splatters upwards, propelled by the vibrations of the track “Transistor” by the German electronic legends Kraftwerk.

The photograph on the right is one of a series entitled Sonic by the German artist Martin Klimas. To create the images, he poured neon-coloured paint on the diaphragm of a loudspeaker and then photographed how the paint responded to full-volume broadcasts of a range of music, from Charlie Parker to Wagner.

“So many artists have worked with music but I never saw work that answered my main question: ‘What does music look like itself?’”, Klimas said in an interview last year. “Putting the music on maximum volume, I leave the creation of the picture to the sound itself ... All music generates interesting forms. I don’t want to be limited to certain styles or periods. I typically select something dynamic and percussive.”

‘Sonic’, along with a selection of Klimas’s other photographic works, from 2005 to 2012, is on view at the Foley Gallery in New York from September 18 to November 3. www.foleygallery.com

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