July 26, 2014 12:46 am

‘Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness’, MoMA

The American artist’s hyperrealistic photographs are often designed to mimic advertisements

American artist Christopher Williams has been designing hyperrealistic photographs for 35 years and is professor of photography at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. Williams stages the works but does not take the pictures himself. “If you’re not the one worrying about the actual machine, you hear or see something you wouldn’t normally hear or see,” he says.

Often designed to mimic advertisements, the flawlessly composed images are intended to challenge viewers to examine the power of marketing.

The image above is included in The Production Line of Happiness (see slideshow), the first retrospective of Williams’ work, at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, which opens Sunday.

‘Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness’ is at MoMA until November 2.

Slideshow photographs: David Zwirner, New York/London and Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne; Collection of Liz and Eric Lefkofsky/Christopher Williams; Katherine and Keith L. Sachs/Christopher Williams; Private collection/Christopher Williams

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