January 11, 2013 3:48 pm

Glasgow to host Turner Prize in 2015

The Turner Prize will go to Scotland for the first time, as Tate gallery announced that Glasgow’s Tramway will host the exhibition of shortlisted candidates and the award ceremony in 2015.

Britain’s foremost contemporary arts prize is hosted outside London in alternate years as part of an effort to boost the profile of contemporary art across the UK. It appeared in Gateshead in 2011 and this year will take place in Londonderry, the UK’s City of Culture for 2013.

Glasgow artists have figured heavily in the recent history of the £25,000 prize, which is given to a British artist under 50 for an exhibition held in the previous 12 months. Martin Boyce, an artist from the city, who won in 2011, followed Susan Philipsz, a Glasgow native, in 2010 and Richard Wright in 2009.

Sir Nicholas Serota, Tate director, said: “Over the last 20 years, Glasgow and Scotland have gained national and international recognition as a centre of excellence in, and for, the visual arts and for many years artists who are from Scotland or who have trained at the Glasgow School of Art, one of the world’s leading art schools, have been nominated for, or won, the award.”

Tramway beat three other shortlisted regional venues to host the award: Nottingham Contemporary, New Art Gallery in Walsall and Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester.

Gordon Matheson, leader of Glasgow city council and chair of Glasgow City Marketing Bureau, one of the bodies that jointly bid to host the prize, said the award would allow the city to “build on its growing reputation as Scotland’s cultural powerhouse”.

Tramway was the city’s main tram depot and terminus until the decline of the vehicles’ use in the 1960s. It was saved from demolition ahead of Glasgow’s year as City of Culture in 1990.

The complex of buildings has hosted work by British sculptor Andy Goldsworthy, as well as performances by director Peter Brook and Canadian director Robert Lepage. In 2009, it became the headquarters of the Scottish Ballet.

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