December 3, 2012 5:24 pm

CME investigates former Goldman trader

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Glenn Hadden, the well-known US Treasuries trader who was hired last year to head Morgan Stanley’s interest rates business, is being investigated by regulators at the CME Group over trades he made while at Goldman Sachs.

The CME is looking into Treasury futures orders “placed on the expiration date in December 2008”, according to a report by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. Morgan Stanley declined to comment beyond confirming that Mr Hadden is still in his current position.

Mr Hadden joined Morgan Stanley in early 2011. He was formerly head of government bond trading at Goldman Sachs, where he was a partner.

A person familiar with the CME’s investigation said both Morgan Stanley and Goldman only learnt of the matter in recent months. However, Goldman put Mr Hadden on paid leave for about a year in 2009 after receiving a separate complaint regarding his Treasuries trading from another regulator, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Mr Hadden is known for his bold trades and Morgan Stanley had been seeking to boost the reputation and market share of its fixed income business back in 2010, when Goldman told its workers Mr Hadden was leaving the firm.

However, those big bets have sometimes backfired. Last year, Morgan Stanley lost tens of millions of dollars after Mr Hadden’s interest rate group made a wrong-way bet on US inflation expectations.

At Morgan Stanley, Mr Hadden has also taken on ambassadorial roles including acting as a judge in the investment bank’s annual prize for excellence in financial markets.

It’s not the first time Morgan Stanley has hired a trader from Goldman who later became enmeshed in regulatory investigations. Matthew Marshall Taylor was last month accused by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission of defrauding Goldman of $118m and concealing a futures position worth more than $8bn.

A lawyer for Mr Taylor told Reuters in a statement: “Matt Taylor is disappointed the CFTC filed a complaint about trades in a Goldman proprietary account which took place five years ago . . . He strenuously denies all of the allegations.” He reportedly left Morgan Stanley in July.

Mr Hadden’s lawyer, James Benjamin of Akin Gump, said: “The CME matter concerns technical risk-management activity in a one-minute period four years ago during which Mr Hadden acted properly and followed established market practice. There is no legal or factual basis for any suggestion of market manipulation.”

The CME investigation into Mr Hadden was first reported by the New York Times.

A spokesman for Goldman Sachs declined to comment. The CME declined to comment.

Additional reporting by Gregory Meyer

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