December 29, 2012 12:01 am

DeAnne Julius of Chatham House made dame

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DeAnne Julius has been made a dame for her services to international relations after almost a decade as chairwoman of the Royal Institute of International Affairs, the respected think-tank in London more commonly known as Chatham House.

DeAnne Julius, who chaired Chatham House between 2003 and this July, has been an articulate voice on the economics and politics of the financial crisis. This month she warned of the risk of a “GFC II” or second global financial crisis, arguing international co-operation was needed to mitigate it.

The American-born economist, who has US and British citizenship, has had a career spanning business, international relations and economics. She was chief economist at British Airways and Shell before she became one of the first appointees to the Bank of England’s new Monetary Policy Committee in 1997. She also spent four years on the BoE’s governing body and has become a critic of the institution’s culture and structure.

“The hierarchy was strong and self-perpetuating,” she wrote of her time there, in the Financial Times last month. “When, as an MPC member, I asked for a detailed briefing on a research note prepared by a bright young economist, their boss always came along and did most of the talking. There were few women in middle management, let alone at the top.”

She sits on the advisory boards of UK and US hedge funds and is also an independent non-executive director at Deloitte, the auditor and consultancy, Roche Holdings, the Swiss drugs company, and Jones Lang LaSalle, the US property company.

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