The fourth part of this series examines Beijing's moves to reposition the renminbi as a world currency as doubts grow about the future of the dollar and the euro

Renminbi currency hub suitors emerge

London leads the race to become the second global hub for renminbi after Hong Kong

Interactive feature: Trade and the RMB

A look at where the RMB trade is located as well as its flow and procedures

Interactive graphic: China’s growing reserves

Track the RMB trade-weighted exchange rate against China’s foreign and gold reserves, along with an import/export comparison

Renminbi gains traction in cross-border trade

Multinationals are starting to take advantage of Beijing’s relaxation of currency controls

Renminbi bond funds begin to take off

Investor appetite grows after a slow start

Taiwan banks to clear renminbi transactions

Beijing takes next step in push to build global currency

China currency tracker

Tracking China’s currency

This interactive graphic shows changes in the present value of the renminbi

London calling for dim sum bonds

The UK capital is keen to take advantage of the liberalisation of the Chinese currency

Temperature drops in currency wars for G20

Eurozone not exchange rates will dominate summit

Hong Kong to offer renminbi loans to banks

Central bank aims to boost liquidity in offshore renminbi market

Steps to making the renminbi international

A review of the RMB’s milestones and challenges

Part One

Renminbi’s mysterious rise: trade finance or interest arbitrage?

The Chinese currency is one of the least-used when it comes to all payments, but it is now the third-biggest currency for letters of credit, after the dollar and the euro

Renminbi starts to go global

While Chinese authorities still control the renminbi tightly, many expect it could ultimately rival the dollar as a global reserve currency

UK business could save by using renminbi

Iran accepts renminbi for crude oil

Tehran spending the currency on goods from China

Will Hong Kong lose its place as China’s financial centre? Not likely

In the run up to Hong Kong’s return to China in 1997, a favourite topic of debate was whether Shanghai would supplant Hong Kong as China’s financial centre

Rmb discontents: where’s Europe?

The renminbi is back in the US political arena, with Mitt Romney vowing to call China a ’currency manipulator’ if elected president

Onshore and offshore RMB – there is a distinction?

Reports that the People’s Bank of China has moved to tighten controls on offshore renminbi trading may have sent a chill down the spines of some new investors in Hong Kong’s fledgling offshore renminbi market

China’s currency is [censored]

There’s a missing word somewhere in the IMF’s latest Article IV consultation on Chinese economic policy. Can you spot it?